Tunbridge Wells Artisans is OPEN!!

The Stables next to the George Pub Mount Ephraim

– if you are in the area pop in for amazing artisan made products. find that original gift!

We’re open Wednesday – Sunday 11am to 4pm

Pottery, wood craft, silk garments, jewellery, glass, paintings and prints, Lino print, driftwood, felt, ceramic mosaic, soft furnishing, children’s clothing……..

 

 

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Tunbridge Wells Artisans

Tunbridge Wells Artisans!

A new and exciting Arts and Crafts venue is opening in Tunbridge Wells, Kent on 17th November 2017 – just in time for Christmas.

The Stables, at the The George pub at the top of Mount Ephraim is a beautiful old building and perfect to host local artists and craftsmen!

 

I have booked my gallery space amongst the beams and rafters and there are still a couple of gallery spaces left – so check out the website!

Tunbridge Wells Artisans

 

New felt sculptures

I am working on four new felt sculptures in the form of Modern Dance.

ECHOTEK

The movement and emotion in this art form is wonderful and I use images of dancers to create the sculptures.

Starting with a wire I make a skeleton and then cover it lightly with knitted fabric to give me a soft layer to attach the wool fibres. I then build up the musculature with layers of wool fibre using soap and water to felt so that the final shape is firm and well sculpted.

 

The decorative skin is a piece of handmade felt that I hand stitch onto the body of the sculpture – this is the most time consuming part of the process.

Three dancers ready to be mounted on wood

I love the contrast between the rough felt and smooth polished wood – both are natural and compliment each other.

People often ask me how to look after their felt sculptures – and it is very simple!

Just wipe gently with a damp cloth to remove dust. Moths are the main concern especially in the summer. You can buy moth killer to spray on the felt or periodically put the felt sculpture in the freezer over night – this will kill any moth eggs.

I will be posting the dance sculptures in my shop in the near future and if you are interested in ordering a sculpture or would like me to notify you when new sculptures are ready – please contact me.

 

Hawaiian Symbols and Tattoos

I am researching the origins and symbolism of Hawiian tattoos as part of pattern design development for men’s swim and sportswear.

As always the history of any pattern is fascinating – just follow the creative trail of human endeavour!

Polynesians from the Marquesas Islands first came to Hawaii about  1,500 years ago and 500 years later Tahitians arrived bringing there taboos and customs that included the art of tattooing.

Tattooing was unknown in the western world before to Captain Cook’s first voyage through Polynesia in 1778

The word tattoo is one of only a few words used internationally that have a Polynesian origin coming from the word ‘tatau’ used in Tahiti, Tonga, and Samoa. In Hawai‘i the word became ‘kakau’

http://www.coffeetimes.com/tattoos.htm

 

As the name suggests, the origin of tattoos goes back to indigenous tribes in the Bronze Age, which was about 5000 years ago. In fact the word “tattoo” derives from the word “tatau” in Polynesian. All of the people living on Marquesan island in Polynesia were tattooed. They regarded the tattooed symbols as a form of language. In this particular culture the images were usually inspired by animals. For example, shark teeth represented protection, and shells meant wealth. Other common symbols included turtles, fish hooks, and lizards. Due to the early origins of this style of tattooing, no one is really sure exactly how it was first developed. Some theorize that it was likely an accident that led to the first tribal tattoo.

Tribal tattooing was not just a physical adornment. It was also part of a tribes spirituality. There were three major factors that took the practice of tribal tattooing from being purely art to being a spiritual symbol as well: Pain, Permanence and Loss of the Life Source (blood). This mystical trio elevated the tattoo from mere art and transformed it into an opportunity to draw people into a relationship with God.

Because body and soul were generally thought to be identical to one another, your tattoos then existed on both the physical and spiritual planes.

While meanings vary from culture to culture and time period to time period, there are many similarities across these cultures and times.

Polynesian Culture

  • Protection
  • Wealth
  • Courage

Maori Culture

  • Social Status
  • Rank
  • Job
  • Achievements
  • Inner Strength

European Culture

  • Membership

Modern Cultures

  • Membership of Fraternal Order, Military, or gang
  • Marriage
  • Rights of Passage
  • Totem Animal Guardianship
  • Magical Reasons

http://www.tattooswithmeaning.com/tribal-tattoo-meaning/

Mood board for design development

I used a great little iPad app “Moodboard lite’ to create this board.

This is a great site for information about Polynesian tattooing and its history and symbolism and cultural significance:

Initial pattern sketches

 

 

Make it in Design Summer School

I have joined the Make it in design Summer School 2017. The course is a fun series of briefs focused on experimenting with new patterns ideas and techniques for surface patterns designers.

Week 1 Brief

Your brief is to design a mystical, tribal inspired
pattern using the following prompts:
  • Be inspired by the supernatural, geometry, astronomy, magic, nature, minerals and the cosmic to create your pattern
  • Think about dark symbols, landspaces, the cosmos, flower mandalas, fractals, geometric shapes, symmetry and symbols

Key words that attract me:

Mandalas

  •  Circular designs symbolizing the belief that life is never-ending. A Mandala represents wholeness, and is an apparent shape in life, the earth, moon and sun

Symbols

  • Representations of life, fecundity, ritual, war, protection, communication
  • Viking Runes
  • Textile patterns – carpets and cultural clothing

Fractals

A fractal is a never-ending pattern. They are created by repeating a simple process or pattern over and over.

  • Shell, flowers, ferns, crystals

Geometric design

  • Islamic patterns
  • Precision and repetition

Repetition, movement and symbolism are key points for the design development that I will start today! More later next week – deadline 9th August so I’m gathering my pens, pencils and geometry kit and heading to my studio!

References:

Islamic Geometric Patterns 12 May 2008 by by Eric Broug

Viking Language 1 Learn Old Norse, Runes, and Icelandic Sagas: Volume 1 (Viking Language Series) by Jesse L. Byock

Hali Magazine

www.mandalas.com

 

 

Jiang Zhoahe

Jiang Zhoahe 1904 – 1986

Born in Sichuang Province in 1904, Jiang Zhaohe is one of the most famous 20th century painters in China and a contemporary of Xu Beihong and Qi Baishi

He studied with established masters such as Xu Beihong and Qi Baishi and mastered many  different modes of artistic expression, including sculpture.

In the Autumn of 1927 he made acquaintance with Xu Beihong in his friend’s home. During the following years they established a long lasting friendship. In 1928 he was appointed as teacher by Li Yi of the education school of Nanjing Central University to teach design pattern. In 1930 Jiang transferred to Shanghai Art School as the sketch professor. In 1937 he held the display of his latest painting works in Beijing. In 1947 he was appointed as a professor by Xu Beihong in Beiping art school. In 1950, he was appointed as a professor in Central Academy of Fine Art.

Reference

“Liu Min Tu” -The Refugees 1943

‘Inspired by Mr. Jiang’s experience during the War of Japanese Invasion, the painting portrays the suffering of over sixty ordinary people during the war. The original piece is about 32m high and 30m long in total and was created in 1941. However, 10 metres of the picture was ruined and the remaining 20metres is now kept in the National Art Museum of China in Beijing.’

Jiang Zhaohe’s huge handscroll Liumin tu (Refugees), painted secretly in occupied Beijing, stands out as a remarkable achievement.

Jaing Zhaohe had had it in mind for a long time to record the suffering of refugees and the poor in an ambitious work, and is said to have lived for a year and a half in the slums of Beijing, Shanghai, and Nanjing before embarking on the Liumin tu. This huge scroll, two meters high and twenty-six meters long, contained over a hundred figures. To avoid attracting attention, he worked on it section by section. Finally completed in the autumn of 1943, the scroll was put on show in the Imperial Ancestral Temple in Taimiao. Within a few hours, Japanese soldiers burst into try to close the exhibition; so truthful a picture of life under the Occupation was offensive to the occupying power. Later that afternoon, orders came from Japanese police headquarters to take the painting down, officially because of the “poor lighting” in the hall.

In the following summer, Jiang Zhaohe took the scroll to Shanghai for an exhibition in the French Concession. A week later, the Japanese “borrowed” it. It then disappeared until 1953, when it was discovered in a warehouse in Shanghai. By that time, the second half of the scroll was lost–destroyed, it was said, by a Japanese officer–and today exists only in photographs. The surviving half was badly damaged.

A Chinese critic has called the Liumin tu China’s Guernica. But here is none of the screaming horror, the pitiless cruelty of Picasso’s work. Suffering and despair, the dying and the dead, are here rendered with a quietness that is far more tragic, because it is more human. It is fortunate that it is the first half that has survived, for it has more variety and movement than the lost section, and the figures seem less posed. Taken as a whole, it is a deeply moving work. Art and Artists of Twentieth-Century China.

 

Reference

Fortunately Jiang Zhoahe took pictures of his masterpiece and a replicated version was painted by his students based on the photos to pay tribute to this virtuoso in the 90th anniversary of Mr.Jiang’ birth in 1994.

Video of Jiang Zhoahe’s life and art.

My Pinterest board of paintings by Jiang Zhoahe.

3 Jackets

I have been experimenting with hand dyeing and painting fabric and the fabric I have chosen for this development is a beautiful ottoman rib viscose/cotton fabric.

The fabric has behaved beautifully during the dyeing processes and has been a joy to make into garments.

So to recap:

Three dye techniques:

  1. Shibori kimono

A simple kimono design – medium size 14 -16 UK

Shibori pattern – 2 metres ready to cut the pattern pieces.

Kimono pattern:

Kimono pattern

 

2. Ikat design jacket

A short boxy jacket with machine stitched ribs

I made the fabric into a short boxy jacket – size 14/16. Great with black dress or trousers or team with jeans for a BOHO look!

3. Shocking pink jacket

Hand painted twice with a rich, deep pink dye I have used this lovely fabric to make a kaftan style jacket with some shaping at the waist  with set in sleeves and lined.

To embellish the plain fabric I cut sections of gold embroidery from an old Zari sari and have stitched it down one side of the front.

See examples on my Etsy shop

To my dyeing day No.2!!

Two metres of wide fabric is a lot to dye!!

  1. The first piece is very deep pink – all over liquid procion dye applied with a wide brush. I left the fabric covered with plastic sheet over night to get a really saturated colour.
  2. Shibori dyed with liquid indigo coloured procion dye. Cured 22 hours

3.  Brush painting in strong pink, orange, yellow and green and black procion dye paste. Cured 20 hours

I poured the black dye paste into a silk paint bottle with a fine nib and drew the black outlines of pattern onto the fabric and then added the other colours with a brush. It was very random and I just had to keep going not really knowing what the outcome would be. The main problem I had was to get the black dye paste to flow evenly from the paint bottle. The nib was a little to narrow and I think un-mixed dye particles clogged it easily – a lesson for next time.

The finished design is really experimental and unpolished but I will persevere!

Here are the finished fabrics ready to be made into jackets this week – with some extra embellishment: